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spring, maryland. in their video, they asked the president to make the economy and deficit reduction a party in 2013. >> we face the greatest challenge of all. a massive debt and exceeding the entire size of our company. >> the debt affects all of us. the nation is on the road to dallas -- two banker secured >> balance the budget now. >> it is a very big, political policy decision. does create large deficits into the future. we must reduce the deficit. >> it would affect a lot of people in a lot of different ways. >> it is time that we raise the bar. >> deficit is our our economy -- >> i'm pretty sure it has to do with the economy and the government. >> lack of something. debt. a debt that we can't pay. >> i really have no idea. although much of the younger generation is unaware of what he does that is, it is a factor in the nation, economy, and our future. >> stairmaster president, in order for the united states to the life ofbe in freedom and liberty, the growing deficit and debt should be the most important issue to consider in your presidential journey. isat the moment, our futur
in the current state of the economy. this is from fall of 2012. we will see if that changes post-boston and if those numbers go up. this goes to the earlier segment that you aired, this idea that the united states is compcent with respect to terrorism. i think the survey demonstrates it is among the things that people think about your it i also think that the law enforcement community is certainly not complacent when it comes to terrorism. the boston event was a security event. there's a lot of individuals covering that event, from federal, state and local. i don't think that boston happened due to complacency. i don't think we necessarily are complacent. m asink we have accepted ew facet of our reality, albeit one that does not happen that frequently. host: if you want to look at the numbers, you can go to start.umd.edu to get more information. bill braniff, from the national consortium for the study of terrorism & responses to terrorism. caller: good morning. i think these two crimes are quite separate. the man in connecticut was angry concerning his disease. he shot his mother
. maybe this shows it is very positive from the standpoint of the economy, if you use dynamic scoring. if you use statics deploring it is not and cannot so well. -- static scoring it is not going to come out so well. i have a question for the other witness. you said this in your statement tionhis is aasnab. the obvious question is whether or not there are sufficient jobs for average americans and illegal immigrants. the answer is no. >> as i indicated to us recently. latere have a participation rate we have a supply of low-skilled labor. it appears that what do is leapfrogging those individuals. we have millions upon millions of americans, not just black americans, but millions upon millions who do not have a job right now. i think it is a good idea to inform -- to reform immigration system but regard must be given to the fact that we have an over abundance of people not working today. we are at rates we have not sn in 80, 75 years. it is astonishing. if we have regularize asian of a greater pool of individuals who can compete on a one by one basis with americans here today those indi
. this looks that the impact on jobs and the economy. >> immigration. the average american wants to -- >> grace wiseman second place winners in the student cam, petition. their message look set a legal immigration and the impact on jobs in the u.s. economy. >> immigration, allowing people to enter our borders can be beneficial to immigrants and the rest of the country. >> when it comes to immigration, it is not right versus left, republican vs. democrat issue. it is those who have power to influence policy. and the average american heart regardless of political affiliation does want to see immigration laws enforced. amnesty. chris immigration laws. take up the highest unemployment rate right now is the young people. -- >> the highest and a plummet right now is the young people. the problem is is the way we have done it, they do not pay tax. you have to pay tax. and the employer would pay the tax. a ford are did not pay because it will not be here -- foreigner does not pay because they will not be here long. but we did not have the employer pay either. if the employer hires you, you will have to
includes a substantial drop we experienced with the recession in 2008 and 2009 and a fairly week economy since then. it says that people do value hard copy correspondence from businesses. they want that information in hard copy and they're resisting the idea of going totally digital. we've heard of people that did do that and either piss manied a payment or got nervous and said hey, start those bills back up again. don't write the obituary for first class mail. it accounts for $28 billion of revenue for the postal service today and i guarantee you it's the going to be around for a long while. the most promising part of our business in terms of growth is package delivery, which is up ricin threat. mail got delivered. you saw what happened with hurricane sandy, the mail got delivered. day in and day out, do an excellent job and the postal service plays an important role in the american economy but today it has a business model that is broken. the good thus -- news is that it can be fixed. it requires we ask fundamental questions about what kind of postal service is best for america in the
to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let in people crossing our borders who take away jobs. our approach is balanced. the border security triggers are strong, but achievable. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz eakin has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.7 trillion. we wanted this legislati
that it doubles down on a dead end energy policy that's hurting our economy, hurting our environment and our health. burning fossil fuels is a primary cause of climate change, and we simply can't afford to continue down this destructive path. it makes far more sense to focus on developing the clean, renewable energy technologies that we all know we're going to need down the road. developing these technologies will create quality, long-term jobs that can't be shift overseas. it's good for business. it's good for our planet. it's good for our national security. there's no reason why we can't put aside our differences and take action to promote a clean energy future. it's what our constituents sent us here to do. our window of opportunity is rapidly closing. the time to act is now. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam
a majority in congress since 1997. the mexican economy has expanded mexican have maintained growth since 2009. fromdp has increased $7,979 in 2009, to 2146 in 2011. in purchasing above 15,500. on gdp growth, almost four%, a higher rate, and is expected to grow 3.5% in the year. this is measured by j.p. morgan. mexico is also taking care of its people. the brookings institution has highlighted that 60% of mexicans are middle class. by 2030, 80.5% of mexicans will be middle class. housing has increased more in the early 1's. all of these factors that have taken place review the immigration pressures of the past. academic think tanks estimate that net migration between mexico and the united states is close to zero. a recent survey shows only 11% of mexicans say they would leave mexico if given the opportunity. a decline of about half from a 31% 2007. -- in 2007. over the last few years, our common border has increasingly become an area of prosperity. more more dynamic and secure than it has ever been. four in the united states and six in mexico, have a population of 92 minute -- 90 million peopl
enough to keep united states competitive in our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion about what is going on in america, i travel to germany where i met a man who gave me -- who told me how things were done in germany compared to america. there are many specialist in america, but our system in germany is very dynamic. our workers are used in very many areas of the work. my american rent was supplies -- see the same staff. all three eggs are learned in the apprenticeship area it is the world -- apprenticeship. >> apprenticeship? not good enough? i needed an explanation. that is what i spoke to the headmaster of whence mr. -- of westminster academy. >> one of the challenges is that changing. it was a time in which the mother, father, children, could be the home in which they would be growing up with both parents. now when students go to school they only have one parent or there are issues in the home, they are bringing those challenges into the classroom. i think what schools should do is help children love to learn, love to read, become thinkers. become problem solvers.
and the free enterprise piece of this which gives our economy most vigor and i would advise people that are preparing to take the nationalization test, that's a choice by the educational foundation to understand our history and language, one of the questions that will be there, what is the economic system of the united states? the answer to that is free enterprise capitalism. that's what gives our economy its vigor. and when we move away, when we move towards government management of our economy, government bailouts, government deciding who is too big to allow o fail, so much of our economy loses its vigor and we lose some of the promise of the great american civilization. another piece of this also that i speak to relatively often, mr. speaker, and that is american vigor and last component of the american exceptionalism that i'll list here tonight. american vigor, where does that come from? well, we have natural-born american citizens that are part of the civilization and culture. and they are -- and these natural-born american citizens are the did he sent ants who came here with
improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and our economy. the server the would- conservative economists has found that -- the leaseholds beacon has found that immigration reform would -- would save the country $11 billion. the bill has been online since tuesday night. we will not begin marked up until the first week of may, giving everyone three weeks to read this bill and prepare amendments. chairman patrick leahy has pledged an extensive markup. the committee improves -- include some leading opponents of immigration reform, who will have a chance to challenge our ideas. this ensures the bill will emerge from committee battle tested. we will have a full debate on the floor. senator harry reid has pledged to take it up no later than june. as with any compromise, no one got everything they wanted. there were moments when it looks like an agreement would not come. the negotiations over its future flow program were particularly intense. realizing the high stakes, the business community and organized labor rows to the occasion. richtom donahue and trumpkin
. part of it is the economy. improving economy in the united states tends to attract people as well. we just haven't seen that, but monitor those flms -- numbers. we have -- the thing that troubles me the most is the smugglers who do this for profit, who are taking creative routes either up through the bahamas, we're seeing haitians being run through puerto rico right now. so it's a constant battle as the smugglers get smarter and daring. they are smaller than the land border. >> the smuggler industry, for lack of a better term, is that on the increase, is that on the decrease? what's the trend? it's an recollection spencive undertaking. my understanding is they charge thousands of dollars per person they bring. is that something we've seen an increase in or decrease and if we've seen a decrease, is it because of economic factors? how do we stop these? it sounds like a fast boat through the middle of the caribbean is not something we would necessarily stop. >> i think flow of migrants, it's similar to the flow of drugs. people are very creative. yes, we've seen an increase in those peop
workers is significant in our stagnant economy. the unemployment rate for blacks without a high school diploma was 12 percent, today, it's more than doubled, to 24.6%. now, that clearly shows that we have an oversupply of low skilled labor relative to the -- that is for workers in all such classes, particularly black americans, because research shows that 40 percent of the 18-point percentage decline in the employment rates of black males is attributable to illegal immigration. that's hundreds of thousands of blacks without jobs. it translates to hundreds of thousands who can't pay taxes, who don't support their families on their own dime. the evidence also indicated that in addition to the pressing wage -- sorry, employment levels, illegal immigration drove down wage levels, by the federal reserve bank of atlanta, for example, showed that illegal immigration, and the spike in illegal immigration, was attributable to the nearly $960 per year decrease in wage levels of documented georgians. and the leisure and hospitality industries, it was $1520. for doctors and lawyers, $960 may not b
have had a broken system. it has been a drag on our economy. mr. holtz-eakin, thank you for your testimony. it will help minnesota businesses and families alike. i want to think the senators who ever done this, getting us as far as we have gotten. mr. holtz-eakin, one of the most things i have most pleased about is what it does for agriculture, particularly in minnesota. minnesota is one of the biggest dairy producers in our nation. dairy farmers have not been able to access the work force they have needed for years. one program that allows farmers to get guest workers is open only to seasonal workers, and you cannot milk cows seasonally. you could, but you would get very uncomfortable cows. i have been calling for this -- anyway. enough said. >> i used to be chairman of the senate agriculture committee. you are bringing back to my roots. >> vermont has a very great dairy-producing culture. i'm glad the gang of eight felt the same way. we have heard testimony on the issue of productivity. it seems having access to a dependable legal work force has got to be a boom for various par
. it is the perfect example of the program benefits for the economy and local community where jobs are scarce and a part of vermont where conventional lending is not an option. we appreciate the inclusion of permanent authorization of this important program. we also very much appreciate inclusion of the reforms to the program, highly important to employers in the seasonal industries. ski resorts in the winter, beach communities and this summer rely on these workers to not -- and not only prove to be excellent employees but bring a cultural experience to states that do not necessarily enjoyed a great deal of diversity. when a trained employee can return for several years in a row, it is a great benefit to all. we thank you for including the sections into the bill. in order to enhance security while adding -- in order to enhance security while also facilitating legitimate travel and trade, we strongly support the addition of but 3500 custom boer patrol officers included in the legislation. in order to ensure that officers are allocated properly, we urge the committee to work with cpb to specify
. that is simply not good enough. it keeps the united states competitive and our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion about what is going on in america, i traveled to germany. a cool tour ofng his butchery, he told me how things are done in germany compared to america. there are many specialis america. our apprenticeship system in germany is very dynamic. our workers are used in many areas of the work. my american friend was surprised to see the same staff sleeping and serving. and all the necessary things are learned in a three-year apprenticeship. this apprenticeship system serves as a worldwide example and should definitely be maintained. apprentices' ships? not good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is what i spoke to dr. orsino, headmaster of west mr. academy. what kind of challenge to educators face today? there's a time in which the mother, father, children would ents gto school andnts wlde they only have one parent or there are issues at all. they bring those challenges into the classroom. i think schools should help children love to learn, love to read, becom
states competitive in our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion of what is going on in america, i traveled to germany -- he told up with me how things were done in germany. there are many such special in america. our apprenticeship program in germany is very dynamic. wasmerican friends surprised to see the same staff sweeping and serving. things areessary learned in the three-year apprenticeship. it serves as a worldwide example and should be maintained. >> apprentice ships? not a good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is why i spoke to the headmaster of westminster academy. >> one of the challenge that educators face is the changing of the family. there was a time in which the mother, father, children would be a home in which they would be growing up with both parents. now when students go to school in the only have one parent or there are issues in the home, they're bringing those challenges and to the classroom. what schools could should do it should help children love to learn, love to read, it becomes thinkers, become learners, become problem so
obama, i sided with john kerry, i sided with barney frank. on ensuring our entire economy did not collapse. the bush administration for eight years had turned a blind eye to the fact that a casino had been set up on wall street that was now leading to a collapse of our economy. in 2008, i did not support any of the bush administration era financial regulation policies. but when the threat was that the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did vote to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunications, yes, it was my legislation that broke down the telecom monopolies, cable monopolies that led to a broadband revolution beginning in 1996 that has created millions of jobs in the united states of america, including tens of thousands of them here in the massachusetts economy. and i'm very proud of that. and my name is on the legislation, steve. and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation because it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we weren't -- that'
despite the fact that these jobs are among the highest paying and the most stable jobs in our economy today. it is imperative that we encourage more young americans n.i.t. e studies in the fields. in particular because of the stark racial and gender gaps we see in the programs, it is imperative that we encourage more young women and students of color to enter these fields. we simply won't be able to remain a global leader in these mportant fields without more -- with more than 50% of our nation's brainpower sitting on the sidelines. h.r. 967 doesn't go as far as i would like it to go in addressing these challenges but it does show the need to educate more students in n.i.t. fields and provide the necessary authority for the agencies to pay an important and appropriate role here. and finally, i would be remiss not to mention that nitr-d program serves as a coordinating and planning umbrella for all unclassified federal cybersecurity r&d. our committee addressed specific needs in cybersecurity , r&d separately in h.r. 756 but in doing so, we made sure that both the intellectual and fina
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
on fixing it. immigration reform is vital to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let people crossing our borders who take away jobs. r oach ibanced. the border securitystro,ut achi. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz beacon has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.70 trillion a. we what this legi
is the most important issue? is it the economy? or foreign affairs? what about health care programs? those are all very important issues but done to think if there is one central issue that can solve all our other problems, we should tackle it first? you may be thinking what should this be? it is simple. what then can give the kids the knowledge they need to solve all these other problems? it is education. if we can well-educate our current generation from toddlers to young adults and they have the tools they need to tackle all of these major problems -- >> public school education in this country has taken a back seat to other concerns. abelieve that hurts us as nation. one of the things that has made us so competitive throughout the years passed this the fact that we have had public school education, compulsory public school education. many countries do not invest in that. it is an investment in our future. >> we invest so much into the system but sometimes outcomes are not what we would like. american u.s.n educational system that is failing grossly. there's an issue of states' rights or
for a whole host of reasons and the benefits that reform will provide to our country, to our economy, to our security. and we agree with those coauthors of the legislation in the senate who have made the point in recent days that enhancing our security is one of the reasons why we should press forward with comprehensive immigration reform. speculation about this particular matter is fine, but this is under investigation. the fact is that comprehensive immigration reform, as anybody who has looked into it and can attest, would enhance our security for all the reasons that i talked about at the top. >> okay. -- i'll ask about the faa graham says he disagrees with the obama administration's decision not to prosecute the suspect as an enemy combat it. >> i understand we will have a moment of silence for the victims in boston. that is appropriate, and the president is right to lead that effort. quickly, to the families who have lost loved ones, to those breaks as a nation. to the people of boston, you make us proud by the courage you have shown. to the law enforcement officials and intelligence c
, and in a fairly weak economy since then did that says people about you hard correspondence they receive from businesses. they want that information in hard copy and they are resisting the idea of going totally digital. we have heard anecdotally a lot of people that did do that and either missed a payment and they have said start those bills back up again. do not write the obituary for first-class mail. it delivers a lot of value for the sender and receiver, and it accounts for $28 billion worth of revenue for the postal service today, and i guarantee it will be around for a long while. the most promising part of our business in terms of growth is package delivery, which is up more than 14% over last year's. we have created much of a credit by innovating and marketing new offerings, and we are benefiting from the big rise in e-commerce. andway people use the mail deliver service is changing it and is an exciting, and these changes will create opportunities for growth for the postal service and drop the entire mailing industry. the postal service is a tremendous organization, with the exceptio
strong human rights prevail are countries where people do better. economies thrive, rule of law are stronger, governments are more effective and they are countries that leade wod stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't just an indicator that a country is doing well, it unleashes a country's potential and helps to advance growth and progress. i ask you to think of a country like berma for a minute. cause of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reach wrd we want it to be? no but it is on the road and it is moving. more people are participating it ding to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the bermese government is opening their doors and developing stronger partnerships around the world. many challenges remain, corruption has to be rooted out. political prisoners need to be freed. horrible mob violence is another stressing reminder on how long it takes to build what is called the habits of the
the economy. >> we ask what he would say. >> come see us in detroit, but there are a lot of great things happening here. .ome see what we are doing here >> many campaign promises were made. the most important should be the promised president obama made to himself. in for prestige or wanted to change the lives for the better. politics forinto prestige or wanting to change the lives for the better. the best way would be to change the people or communities the spur them to action. >> congratulations to all the winners. videos, andwinning studentcam.org. >> they say it is not perfect but it is a balance. the group is made up of senator mccain, rubio, d bennett. conference is 50 minutes. afternoon. we are here to announce that eight senators from opposite sides of the political aisle are coming together on a common sense immigration reform proposal we believe we can pass the senate. i want to thank my colleagues. each of us is strong-willed. each of us has differing beliefs, but if you would have seen that room in any of our meetings and seen anyone argue strongly but come together and realiz
the next chapter in american history by reinvigorating our economy and enriching ournity. the kind of country that attracted my maternal grandparents here. or my wife's parents, when they came here and became citizens, productive citizens. in vermont immigration has promoted cultural riches, settlements, exchange, economic development, center programs, and tourism and trade with our friends in canada. agricultural workers support our farmers and growers and many have become part of the farm families that are such an integral part of the vermont communities. today's witnesses, two vermonters talking about the needs of farmers and the challenges they face. the national tourism trade is critical to a border state, like vermont. now, let me point out one thing that has troubled me a great deal. last week opponents of comprehensive immigration reform began to exploit the boston marathon bombing. -- newnewfoundlander englander. i spent a lot of time in boston growing up and do so today. friends and relatives there, i urge restraint in that regard. they have enriched this country from our
for the sequester, which is currently having and will have a very, very negative effect on our economy, on jobs, and on the confidence that americans have that we are pursuing rational policy. the the gentleman and i both have agreed that sequester is not a rational policy. it deals with high priority and low priority items in very much the same way. so my question, mr. leader, is there a possibility, not on the calendar, you didn't announc it, bui w you that we go to conference, preferably, the first day we are back, after this weekend, so that we could get to work on trying to get to an agreement on one of the most pressing problems in front of this country, and that's getting ourselves on a fiscally sustainable path. i yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. i appreciate the spirit with which he recommends that we proceed along the lines of those individuals that he spoke about had asked for. and i would say to the gentleman, mr. speaker, that i'm told that our chairman and the chairman on the other side of the capitol, ms. murry, they are meeting and looking to see the path f
% of poll, only americans think that control is an important problem mostly economy in general, 24% think that is most important. federal budget deficit and federal debt is 11%. here is the front page of "the new york daily news," -- lindsay is an independent here in washington d.c.. you are on "washington journal." am really sad and i want to make sure if one does in this country that 31,000 people per year are killed by guns. this is a normal and we did this is a horrible number for its allies civilization. horrible number for a civilization. stronger gun laws can make a difference. calling in.you for this is the front page of " the washington times." michael is from rockville center, new york. caller: the reason this legislation failed is not only would it have not prevented the terrible tragedy that occurred in connecticut but also the tragedy in colorado. abroad is lacking because it would appear both parties have used this issue to raise money and at the same time not really address it responsibly. i think most americans are on to the fact that would appear you bringin -- that what
economy work and define those things that are going to lead our country forward. it is a privilege to be here with you talking about ideas from the working families flexibility act that you are working hard on and i'm a proud co-sponsor but also ways we are going to find solutions for people across this country who are raising families, trying to pay for college trying to pay the energy bill for the month. mr. gardner: we have an incredible opportunity to get government out of the way and let america work, to unleash the entrepreneurs around this great nation over the past several months over the past couple of years, we have held dozens of town meetings, whether they are in southeastern colorado, northeastern colorado, the denver metro area, the new parts of my district, talking to families, talking to people who are struggling to make ends meet. people who have had to pick up a second job just to pay the bills. and as we talk tonight about making life work and i believe #makinglifework and i would like to hear from people around the country how we an help be a part of these solut
will go. and sometimes invest in a place where the economy is not where it would support necessarily a market solution, which is why a.i.d. has to be there. so you've got the millennium challenge corporation over here, a.i.d. as the preponderance of our expenditure, but it has adopted significant reforms in the last years that have actually movement some of the development challenge kinds of enterprize into a.i.d. wherever we can we are trying to do economic-based aid in a local way that is sustainable. and that will result in long-term gains, not a project that comes, and when the project's over the money's gone and there is nothing to show for it. but there are someplaces where you still have humanitarian demands and other demands that will not lend themselves to that, and we just need to understand that. we have to understand that's for the minimum -- minimalist fraction of the percentage of our aid that may represent, it's still an expression of our values and interest and it's important. now we are -- i'm not going to sit here and tell this committee that the job is done. we are
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
dollar deficits, to a fledgeling economy and declining military -industrial base. we can now add to that the devastating effects of sequestration to our servicemen and women. sequestration is the wrong approach to bring in spending, particularly as our nation's military readiness will foolishly suffer. however, we are under sequestration. and i hope you can clarify for me some of its impacts. we have recently heard that the army has canceled seven combat center training rotations, the navy has canceled ship deployments. air force has stood 12 combat-coded squad rons, not to mention potential civilian furloughs for up to 14 days all due to sequestration and i hope you can translate that into the real world for us, including what that means in terms of readiness and force posture. we'll continue to wrestle with these issues with you. i'm very happy and pleased to see during the fiscal 2013 c.r. that we were able to include the full year defense and veterans -- milcon and veterans bills, giving you some much needed flexibility in funding for d.o.d. past three years we worked across
invested in the innovation economy, and they wanted us to do what we've always done historically, rebuild our infrastructure. for us back home, that means rebuilding our levees, our roads and our highways. they want washington, d.c., to start getting about the business of pushing this country forward. i applaud these community leaders because this is exactly what citizen-led democracy looks like. mr. speaker, i applaud the sacramento metro chamber of commerce for their leadership, and i look forward to the 44th annual cap to cap next year. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, for my neighbors and friends back home in illinois and families across the country today is tax freedom day. the date at which the average american worker will finally start earning money for themselves after paying their federal, state, and local tax obligatio
discussion we dp, i understd how important refming our immigration system is to our economy and our national security. i cannot support immigration reform if we cannot be satisfied we have secured the border. getting that chicks were we can talk about how we are doing -- getting the metrics were we can talk how we are doing will be critical to getting my support and others. we look forward to working with you to come up with a definitive metrics. chairman of the transportation of security and subcommittee, i'm interested in the tsa budget. i will direct my questions in that direction. it seems logical as we are moving toward risk-based security with the tsa. the thing i have always supported. i support that. it seems to me we have moved theres security and should be significant costs saving for the taxpayer as he do risk-based screening and focus more on threat that ought to free up resources. we can look at the high-tech baggage screening. we would need a lesson screeners for baggage. software upgrades. the gun, we should be able to resource -- redo some of the workforce there. -- again, we
know you are aware six of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are located in sub- saharan africa, and it is my hope to the extent possible that the state department will prioritize trade with the african nations. you should know that we have a bipartisan, bicameral effort working in conjunction with chairman smith to quickly put forward a renewal of the africa growth and opportunity act. so i have four questions i'd like to ask you. i wanted to know what steps are you taking to focus on africa's extraordinary growth potential? what are your thoughts about the u.s. appointing a special envoy to the d.r.c.? does the request for peacekeeping operations accurately reflect the growing needs on the continent? and can you comment on the significance of the 6% cuts to usaid hiv-aids funding. >> let me emphasize first of all that we are really pleased that pepfar was able to be held whole. i think that's vital. i have personally visited, i was in durbin, north of durbin in the mountains watching how that program is being effectively administered and the difference it has made. we a
diversifying the economy. charlesly, we asked platt what he would say in a message to president obama. >> come see us in detroit. there are a lot of great things happening. you do not always hear about them. come see what we're doing here. take a many campaign promises were made in 2008 and 2012. the most important of all is president obama made to himself, people go into public service for reason, power, money, prestige or wanting to change the lives of many for the better. the best with president obama can show what his reason was, and in turn, what kind of a leader of the van he is would be to help the very people, places, and community that -- community that spurred a young man to action many years ago. >> congratulations to all the letters in this year's sudent cam competition. >> coming up today, 'washington rnal" is next. then,he
to private sector federal systems, the nation at critical infrastructure and our economy. it supports the president's executive order to improve on the cyber security and critical infrastructure security and resilience. finally, to ensure continued resilience to disasters, the president's budget focuses on emergency management. it includes resources for the disaster relief fund for declared disasters or emergencies. the administration is proposing the consolidation of 18 grant programs into one national program to create a robust national response capacity while reducing administrative overhead. this competitive, risk based program will use a comprehensive process to identify and deploy capabilities, put funding together quickly and require grantees to report on their progress. it is this kind of funding that has enhanced capabilities in cities like boston. since 2002, the boston urban area has received $300 million in federal grant funding, which is used to equip tactical teams. within the last year, the metro boston homeland security region used funding to provide training to improv
immigration can affect the u.s. economy. a hearing on friday. then on monday a second hearing. after that we have to see how the process unfolds. especially republicans on the judiciary committee are calling for more than the currently scheduled hearings. probably sometime in early may we will move to the markup process which is where the senators on the judiciary committee can begin offering amendments and releasing how they want to continue to shape the bill. we hope it gets passed out of committee and go to the senate floor. host: rebekah kaplan of the national journal. wilmington, north carolina, kathleen is on our democrat line. is roberta our guest aplan.rebecca caller: my biggest fear is that our country is in a state of fear. thing wehe worst could ever have as americans. we have based our country from the beginning of a great work ethic. there are so many things we could do instead of being frightened every time something happens. domestically, foreman, and immigration. we have a statue of liberty that does welcome everybody. i believe that we should give some amnesty, because of am
the economy grow and every state. >> there has been some discussion about discretion. under current practice they use the authority very sparingly. it said is have shown roughly 1% of all cases. how much more should we expect the department to exercise ?iscretion decks >> mardy do that pursuant to policy. -- we do not think that is pursuant to policy. >> they spent time the information from own cases. significantspend time because there's a discovery .rocess >> provided we have the resources to pull the files, i would have no objection. one of the real logistical issues is contained in paper files. resources, anything we can do to share mind this would be something to be considered. >> the department may have seen some benefits in terms of the overall efficiency. >> what privacy protections need to be put in place to ensure employers to not miss use the system? how with this legislation and improve on it? do you think it to be appropriate to give the states additional funds with the assumption they will meet this ?bligation tax >> theirallows them to put driver's license and database databas
they want in a bill. but if we meet in the middle, can do a lot of good for and for our economy. and so we're feeling very good about this. things are moving in a very, very good way. and the president's support of our proposal, even though he wouldn't fully agree with it, it's just the right place to be, because we want lots of support even from people who agree with every single part. i don't want to give you the impression he is grudging about it. he is enthusiastic about us getting a bill done and as i have said before, playing it just right. moving us forward, but giving us the space to come up with our agreement. and i thanked him and john thanked him for doing that and he is going to continue to do that so we can get a bill done. >> we briefed the president on a number of details, our proposal that the gang of eight is coming up that we will be bringing forward in the united states senate in as short a time as this evening. the president is supportive of the process we went through. the president having been in the senate and having seen this process before is very supportive. the p
of the taliban, they're also very concerned about the economy post 2014 and their ant to seek proper employment. the chairman has outlined that we have eight million that are in school today. the issue is that we raised expectations and those expectations will have to be met with an economy that will support adequate jobs. >> as we look towards the end of 2014 is there a detailed transition plan with the state department and with u.s. a.i.d. for many of the projects that much begun and many that are on the books, where do those projects go as we look forward? >> senator, it is a very detailed transition process. we established a headquarters joust to oversee transition. we're completely overlinked with the a.i.d. and u.s. state department. not only do we have a broad transition plan from every task and we've taken that down to a handful of tasks that still remain to be worked out but every project that's out there right now will have a detailed transition plan as well. >> you mentioned before about security zones in the country, areas that are safer than others. as you look forward to the next
for the u.s. economy. dramatically.at we discovered our immigration system had failed. a number of these individuals should have been allowed into the united states. there was a lot soul-searching about how to correct these problems. the number of visitors to the united states went down dramatically. we have put in place systems in terms oftty good screening. we're trying to have the best of both worlds. we want to encourage people to come to our country. we want to be able to keep up those who are likely to do was this kind of harm. it is a balancing act. the perfect from becoming the enemy of the good? guest: in an open country like the united states, we always have been, you cannot have perfect security. it doesn't mean you cannot do better. host: denver from new mexico. from mexico. caller: i would like to make a comment about the borders. terroristic camps popping up everywhere. again and ages form in these other places that is hard to reach. they are training on the mexico sied states. they are, across our borders -- they are coming across our borders. they are getting aro
global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion about what is going on in america, i traveled to germanny where i met up with mr. sink. he told me how things are done in germanny compared to america. >> there are many specialists in in america. our workers are used in many other areas of work. my american friend was surprised to see the same staff sweeping anding pork and all of the necessary things are learned in the three-year apprenticeship. this apprenticeship system serves as worldwide example and should definitely be maintained here. >> atren 'tis -- apprenticeships not good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that's why i spoke to the headmaster of westminster academy. >> one of the challenges education, educated space today is the changing of the family because there was a time which in which the mother, father and children a home in which we're growing up with both parents. now children go to school with only one parent and issues in the home, they're bringing some of the concerns and challenges into the classroom. i think what schools should do is help childre
currently in our country illegally. many have been here for years and contributing to our economy. knowing who they are is critical to public safety. it must be evidence from the outset there is a pathway to citizenship that will be fair and a tenable. .- fair and attainable dreamers and immigrant farm workers will also be included. those who complete the requirements will be able to achieve lawful status more quickly. the bill will improve our legal immigration system. visas.ses the cap on thes it continues to protect vulnerable immigrants. it creates new temporary worker programs while protecting american workers. businesses must be able to maintain a stable legal workforce if our economy is to continue to grow. this will pressure on the border and reduce illegal flows. the majority of americans support these common sense steps. we are ready to implement them. we can and we will achieve the core provisions of the bill. we stand ready to work with the congress to achieve this important goal. the introduction of this legislation is indeed a milestone. i look forward to continue to working
this policy. which inn facts is always a good policy. a prime money laundering concern. the entire economy is a prime money laundering concern. the famous subject on the banks of delta asia and macau which tracked down successfully kim's own money, that's the father, nearby dandong is the port of dal lifment on. recently a couple years back, the south africans found one of these ships as it came into a south african port filled with chinese rice and wheat and north korean weaponry of all kinds. it obviously had been inspected in dalleon and had been oked for onward proliferation to north korea. let's look at a couple more statistics. their exports to china has quadrupled during this period of 2008 to 2011 of strategic patients and tough financial sanctions and what have you and various u.n. resolution and so on and so forth. so trade may have doubled. according to bun of the prime watchers of north korean economics external and interm, north korean may in fact be running a trade surplus, which i think would shock a lot of people for any poor country. meaning it is exporting capital. north
can live with that. many people believe this will make our information and economy quite safer. is a: catherine lotrionte professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. host: coming up, we will talk about an investigation into the gaps and oversight of compound pharmacies. today is saturday, april 20. we will be right back. >> i strongly urge you to come up with a number that tells this committee and the american people -- we have a responsibility as well. for you to say, we're just going to see how things turn out, he will determine the size of the 2014 force, i believe is a tragic and terrible this date for which we may pay a very heavy price -- mistake for which we may pay a very heavy price. tosenator, i didn't say leave it completely vague. we are advising and assisting at the battalion level. were going to lift off at the brigade level this fall. the 2014 number is inextricably linked to the number we believe we need to provide to assist post 2014. >> you have to wait till 201
this make our information and economy quite safer. aest: catherine lotrionte is professor at georgetown university and has been talking to us about cyber security and privacy. thank you for being on the program. guest: thank you. >> tomorrow on washington ahead to a gunk and immigration legislation. then the executive director of the national consortium for the study of terrorism and responses to terrorism. and the constitution project on the treatment of detainees and the use of torture by the united states. live atton journal," 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. this week, both weekly addresses focused on the boston marathon bombings. at first, president obama, then the republican address from senator tim scott of south carolina. >> on monday, an act of terror when did dozens and killed three innocent people at the boston marathon. but in the days since, the world has witnessed one sure and steadfast truth -- americans refuse to be terrorized. ultimately, that is what we will remember from this week. that is what will remain. as stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, gener
accumulating so much that the economy is at a high risk. >> our debt is the percentage of gdp. in the last 30 or 40 years, it >> our debt is the percentage of g inr yearst has en less than 40%. itly in recent years that we have seen it climb. the fact is we are entering dangerous territory. >> deborah solomon of the "bloomberg view" says that the policymakers are arguing and debating over causes but missing the main culprit -- a shellshocked u.s. economy. >> joshua gordon says that the deficit is continuing to expand because of job loss, causing less revenue and more spending on aid programs. >> you have a large deficit for four years because you have low revenues and people don't have jobs, or they're getting paid less. but also we have this mandatory spending program, which grow on autopilot. unemployment compensation, food stamps programs, medicaid-- they spe ecy is evils are here," says that the entire financial crisis is unclear. >> i think that the underlying issues of the financial crisis have not been fixed at all. indeed, there is no easy fix. >> but there are still
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